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Sensory ideas for older kids with autism

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Sensory ideas for older kids with autism

  • Hello,

    I recently started working at a school where the majority of the kids have a diagnosis of autism and are Jr. high to 21 years old.  I am working on getting sensory diets for these kids and am looking for more ideas.  These kids are big, pretty low functioning and can be aggressive with staff, so please take that into account.  I have the following activities already.

    1. pushing weighted cart: lifting things on/off cart

    2. carrying a heavy milk crate

    3. Carrying a heavy bag

    4. z vibe, chewies and other high intensity foods for oral tools

    5. Tactile: beans, rice, pasta, mood sand, and legos

    6. small trampoline

    7. weigted blanket

    8. swing

    9. playing catch

    10. zoomball

    11. smelly box with olfactory things inside

    12. bean bag for sitting or getting squished in

    13. therapyball for getting rolled on body/back or sitting and bouncing

    14.  they also go outside frequently to walk, playground and ride a large trike.

    Any other inexpensive ideas would be appreciated.

  • we have an inexpensive stationery bike picked up from a yard sale. the kids also are in a walking club block 1 every day where they
    do laps around the gym. And their teacher started a snack cart for teachers to purchase items, so the kids are busy stocking that and carrying bins for it. Keep em busy and moving throughout the day.
    Lisa






  • I am going to look at it from the consumer and OT perspective on this one.

    On the OT perspective, I think this could be great in terms of perhaps getting them ready for employment.  Of course, you also are working on some underlying areas (e.g. proprioception, ideation, etc.)  However, on the consumer perspective, if the caregivers find out what you are doing, they might not like it... since it is not necessarily client-centered.

    Objectively speaking, if such a program is implemented, you better be ready to explain your clinical reasoning.

    Lisa Fass
    we have an inexpensive stationery bike picked up from a yard sale. the kids also are in a walking club block 1 every day where they
    do laps around the gym. And their teacher started a snack cart for teachers to purchase items, so the kids are busy stocking that and carrying bins for it. Keep em busy and moving throughout the day.
    Lisa


     

  • I was just wondering about the trampoline. . . we had placed one in a self-contained middle school life skills classroom as it was on a student's IEP that carried over from elementary school.

    My concern is that there are a couple of students in the classroom that exceed the recommended weight limit on the trampoline (150 lbs).  Does anybody have any idea what the legal ramifications are if a student who exceeds the weight limit gets on the tramp and is injured??

    We considered pulling it all together - extreme resistance from parent

    We considered moving it to another location - again extreme resistance from parent and administration said there wasn't anywhere to really move it.

    Thoughts??

  • Exercises with weights, set up a snack cart for staff that they maintain, find an ex bike at a yard sale, run /jump in place, exercise routines


    Sent from my iPad

    On Oct 5, 2011, at 6:55 AM, Nantnell <bounce-Nantnell@aota.org> wrote:

    I was just wondering about the trampoline. . . we had placed one in a self-contained middle school life skills classroom as it was on a student's IEP that carried over from elementary school.

    My concern is that there are a couple of students in the classroom that exceed the recommended weight limit on the trampoline (150 lbs).  Does anybody have any idea what the legal ramifications are if a student who exceeds the weight limit gets on the tramp and is injured??

    We considered pulling it all together - extreme resistance from parent

    We considered moving it to another location - again extreme resistance from parent and administration said there wasn't anywhere to really move it.

    Thoughts??

  • Also a video rocker chair

    Sent from my iPad

    On Oct 5, 2011, at 6:55 AM, Nantnell <bounce-Nantnell@aota.org> wrote:

    I was just wondering about the trampoline. . . we had placed one in a self-contained middle school life skills classroom as it was on a student's IEP that carried over from elementary school.

    My concern is that there are a couple of students in the classroom that exceed the recommended weight limit on the trampoline (150 lbs).  Does anybody have any idea what the legal ramifications are if a student who exceeds the weight limit gets on the tramp and is injured??

    We considered pulling it all together - extreme resistance from parent

    We considered moving it to another location - again extreme resistance from parent and administration said there wasn't anywhere to really move it.

    Thoughts??

  • what is a video rocker chair?
     

    From: bounce-lisafass@aota.org
    To: dianawoods@hotmail.com
    Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2011 18:12:25 -0400
    Subject: Re: [autismforum] Sensory ideas for older kids with autism

    Also a video rocker chair

    Sent from my iPad

    On Oct 5, 2011, at 6:55 AM, Nantnell <bounce-Nantnell@aota.org> wrote:


    I was just wondering about the trampoline. . . we had placed one in a self-contained middle school life skills classroom as it was on a student's IEP that carried over from elementary school.
    My concern is that there are a couple of students in the classroom that exceed the recommended weight limit on the trampoline (150 lbs).  Does anybody have any idea what the legal ramifications are if a student who exceeds the weight limit gets on the tramp and is injured??
    We considered pulling it all together - extreme resistance from parent
    We considered moving it to another location - again extreme resistance from parent and administration said there wasn't anywhere to really move it.
    Thoughts??

    From: jcoad <bounce-jcoad@aota.org>
    Sent: 4/12/2011 4:02:13 PM

    Hello,
    I recently started working at a school where the majority of the kids have a diagnosis of autism and are Jr. high to 21 years old.  I am working on getting sensory diets for these kids and am looking for more ideas.  These kids are big, pretty low functioning and can be aggressive with staff, so please take that into account.  I have the following activities already.
    1. pushing weighted cart: lifting things on/off cart
    2. carrying a heavy milk crate
    3. Carrying a heavy bag
    4. z vibe, chewies and other high intensity foods for oral tools
    5. Tactile: beans, rice, pasta, mood sand, and legos
    6. small trampoline
    7. weigted blanket
    8. swing
    9. playing catch
    10. zoomball
    11. smelly box with olfactory things inside
    12. bean bag for sitting or getting squished in
    13. therapyball for getting rolled on body/back or sitting and bouncing
    14.  they also go outside frequently to walk, playground and ride a large trike.
    Any other inexpensive ideas would be appreciated.






    Diana Woods

  • A video rocker is a low to the ground plastic rocker, used to watch videos from the floor

    Sent from my iPad

    On Oct 5, 2011, at 6:52 PM, "Diana V. Woods" <bounce-dianawoods@aota.org> wrote:

    what is a video rocker chair?
     

    From: bounce-lisafass@aota.org
    To: dianawoods@hotmail.com
    Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2011 18:12:25 -0400
    Subject: Re: [autismforum] Sensory ideas for older kids with autism

    Also a video rocker chair

    Sent from my iPad

    On Oct 5, 2011, at 6:55 AM, Nantnell <bounce-Nantnell@aota.org> wrote:


    I was just wondering about the trampoline. . . we had placed one in a self-contained middle school life skills classroom as it was on a student's IEP that carried over from elementary school.
    My concern is that there are a couple of students in the classroom that exceed the recommended weight limit on the trampoline (150 lbs).  Does anybody have any idea what the legal ramifications are if a student who exceeds the weight limit gets on the tramp and is injured??
    We considered pulling it all together - extreme resistance from parent
    We considered moving it to another location - again extreme resistance from parent and administration said there wasn't anywhere to really move it.
    Thoughts??

    From: jcoad <bounce-jcoad@aota.org>
    Sent: 4/12/2011 4:02:13 PM

    Hello,
    I recently started working at a school where the majority of the kids have a diagnosis of autism and are Jr. high to 21 years old.  I am working on getting sensory diets for these kids and am looking for more ideas.  These kids are big, pretty low functioning and can be aggressive with staff, so please take that into account.  I have the following activities already.
    1. pushing weighted cart: lifting things on/off cart
    2. carrying a heavy milk crate
    3. Carrying a heavy bag
    4. z vibe, chewies and other high intensity foods for oral tools
    5. Tactile: beans, rice, pasta, mood sand, and legos
    6. small trampoline
    7. weigted blanket
    8. swing
    9. playing catch
    10. zoomball
    11. smelly box with olfactory things inside
    12. bean bag for sitting or getting squished in
    13. therapyball for getting rolled on body/back or sitting and bouncing
    14.  they also go outside frequently to walk, playground and ride a large trike.
    Any other inexpensive ideas would be appreciated.









  • I have worked in places where trampolines were not allowed at all and where the insurance company explicitly stated that they would not cover them. Your administration should check with the insurance company. In any case, using equipment for a student who exceeds the weight limits of a piece of equipment is not good practice and also probably not covered should the student become injured. You may also open yourself up to some liability. You need administrative support on this one. You may be able to find another piece of equipment the student can jump on that is safer (a coworker of mine has a springy dog bed, of all things).

    Good luck,

    Debbie



    I was just wondering about the trampoline. . . we had placed one in a self-contained middle school life skills classroom as it was on a student's IEP that carried over from elementary school.

    My concern is that there are a couple of students in the classroom that exceed the recommended weight limit on the trampoline (150 lbs).  Does anybody have any idea what the legal ramifications are if a student who exceeds the weight limit gets on the tramp and is injured??

    We considered pulling it all together - extreme resistance from parent

    We considered moving it to another location - again extreme resistance from parent and administration said there wasn't anywhere to really move it.

    Thoughts??


    From: jcoad <bounce-jcoad@aota.org>
    Sent: 4/12/2011 4:02:13 PM

    Hello,

    I recently started working at a school where the majority of the kids have a diagnosis of autism and are Jr. high to 21 years old.  I am working on getting sensory diets for these kids and am looking for more ideas.  These kids are big, pretty low functioning and can be aggressive with staff, so please take that into account.  I have the following activities already.

    1. pushing weighted cart: lifting things on/off cart

    2. carrying a heavy milk crate

    3. Carrying a heavy bag

    4. z vibe, chewies and other high intensity foods for oral tools

    5. Tactile: beans, rice, pasta, mood sand, and legos

    6. small trampoline

    7. weigted blanket

    8. swing

    9. playing catch

    10. zoomball

    11. smelly box with olfactory things inside

    12. bean bag for sitting or getting squished in

    13. therapyball for getting rolled on body/back or sitting and bouncing

    14.  they also go outside frequently to walk, playground and ride a large trike.

    Any other inexpensive ideas would be appreciated.