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Updated AOTA Apps Database! Hundreds of Apps for Occupational Therapy

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AOTA's Checking the Pulse blog is written by Web editor Stephanie Yamkovenko who reads hundreds of health and policy articles weekly to find the most engaging and enlightening content. Stay in the know, go beyond the news, and learn how it affects OT.

Updated AOTA Apps Database! Hundreds of Apps for Occupational Therapy

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AOTA’s app database has hundreds of apps that occupational therapy practitioners can use in the clinic – and now the database is updated with nearly 35 news apps!  There are new apps in every practice area. Click here to see what apps you can use in the clinic (this is an AOTA member benefit, if you are not a member yet, check out the benefits of AOTA membership).

The database would not be possible without your help! Thank you to all of the occupational therapy practitioners who have suggested apps for our database (click here to send us apps suggestions). 

I’ve written about apps a lot on this blog (check out those posts here), and as usual I have a few news articles to share about apps. The first article is from the Washington Post who recently ran an article about apps that make outrageous health claims (using the cellphone light to cure acne, for example). These apps are sold in both the iTunes store and the Google Play store and some experts say that not only do the apps not work, but in some cases they also can endanger users. Read more.   

Thankfully not all health apps are based on flimsy science, and the American Medical News featured a piece on how some physicians are “prescribing” smartphone apps to their patients. These apps can help patients monitor their health and in some cases may even be a viable alternative to prescription medications. Read more here

Finally, an occupational therapist was recently featured in a Science Daily article about how apps can help children with dyslexia participate in reading exercises. The OT, Lenin Grajo, points out that smartphone and tablet apps have helped make reading and writing fun for the children. Read more

What is your favorite app to use in the clinic? Tell us in the comments.

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  • I have an LG phone with Android op syst. How do I download the OT APPS?

  • You can click the link to AOTA's app database (www.aota.org/.../Apps.aspx). You will need to log in to the AOTA site with your member log in to see the apps.

    Once you browse the database (which is separated into practice areas) and find an app you would like to download or purchase, you can click the link which will take you to the Google Play Store. The database clearly delineates the Android and Apple apps.

    Let me know if you need help once you get to the Google Play Store.